Skip to main content

Logo for N.C. Cooperative Extension N.C. Cooperative Extension Homepage

Q&A from the Plant Clinic

en Español

El inglés es el idioma de control de esta página. En la medida en que haya algún conflicto entre la traducción al inglés y la traducción, el inglés prevalece.

Al hacer clic en el enlace de traducción se activa un servicio de traducción gratuito para convertir la página al español. Al igual que con cualquier traducción por Internet, la conversión no es sensible al contexto y puede que no traduzca el texto en su significado original. NC State Extension no garantiza la exactitud del texto traducido. Por favor, tenga en cuenta que algunas aplicaciones y/o servicios pueden no funcionar como se espera cuando se traducen.

English is the controlling language of this page. To the extent there is any conflict between the English text and the translation, English controls.

Clicking on the translation link activates a free translation service to convert the page to Spanish. As with any Internet translation, the conversion is not context-sensitive and may not translate the text to its original meaning. NC State Extension does not guarantee the accuracy of the translated text. Please note that some applications and/or services may not function as expected when translated.

Collapse ▲
Master Gardener volunteers of Haywood County logo image

We have wrapped up our in-person plant clinic for the 2022 gardening season, but Master Gardener Volunteers are still available to answer questions remotely via our online Plant Clinic. If you have a gardening question, we want to hear from you!

Email haywoodemgv@gmail.com with a description of any home gardening problem. Or call (828) 456-3575 and describe the issue to the receptionist. Either way, a Master Gardener℠ volunteer in Haywood County will get back to you within a couple of days with research-based information. ©2021 NC State University.

Leyland cypress problems were among the top inquiries we received from homeowners in 2022. Fortunately, the Plant Disease and Insect Clinic has developed a useful diagnostic tool to help narrow down your particular issue. Click here to access the online tool.

Help Us Help You!

Collecting Samples of Plants and Insects

Good samples or photographs will make it much easier to identify a problem.

Some tips for bringing in live samples to the Extension Master Gardener plant clinic:

Plant Samples

  1. Gather samples from the healthy part of the plant as well as the damaged or diseased sections. This will help identify what the “normal” growth looks like next to the problem. If possible, it is helpful to gather samples from older growth and new growth. If multiple plants of the same type are present, taking samples of plants in various stages of the problem will be helpful.
  2. Take a large enough sample that leaves are still attached to stems. Pulling a few individual leaves from the plant will not provide as much information as intact stems.
  3. Look for evidence of cankers along the stem and gather a sample.
  4. For roots, remove sections of healthy, as well as diseased root tissue, along with some of the surrounding soil.
  5. Bring samples in immediately. If they do need to be stored, put them in a dry plastic bag in the refrigerator or cooler.

Insect Samples

  1. Collect any insects present, looking for adult as well as immature forms.
  2. Be sure to collect any samples of the damage the insects are believed to have caused.
  3. Place insects in a tightly lidded glass jar and fill with rubbing alcohol or put in the freezer for several hours.

If it is not possible to bring in a sample, quality photographs can be submitted.

Quality Photographs

  1. To help identify a plant, document the leaf pattern (alternate, opposite), leaf margins, bark, and flowers or fruits if present.
  2. To identify an insect, look for both mature and immature forms. Close-ups of legs and antennae can be particularly helpful. Images of damage they have done, frass, or casings can also help with identification.
  3. To diagnose a problem, be sure to capture healthy parts of the plant, as well as parts that are damaged. Include an image of the entire landscape, the entire plant, as well as close-up images of the problem area, and an image that shows both the problem area and healthy tissue if possible. If symptoms are occurring on leaves, take pictures of both the top and the underside of a leaf.
  4. Take multiple shots with different camera settings to help ensure the best shot.
  5. Use a scale object like a coin or a thumb.
  6. Use a fast shutter speed for moving insects and animals to lessen blurring.
  7. Use macro settings to ensure an in-focus image when taking close-ups.
  8. For birds, butterflies, or other fast-moving subjects, set the camera up on a tripod, turn it on, focus and wait for a good shot.

For more detailed information about gathering samples for submittal, please review the steps on the North Carolina Plant Disease and Insect Clinic’s website: https://pdic.ces.ncsu.edu/how-to-submit/

Article from Extension Gardener Handbook, Chapter 7 Diagnostics, VII Submitting Samples

See you again in 2023!